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Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen

 
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Dock
He's the Keeper of the Fire

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:50 pm    Post subject: Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen Reply with quote

The remaining book from last years Christmas haul. I think I kept it back because I was enjoying the anticipation of reading it. Bruce Springsteen's autobiography is a great read. The opening chapters about his formative years and his family read like something from the pen of a great novelist. If he ever gets tired of all that Rock n' Roll Icon malarkey I'm sure he could slip seamlessly into writing fiction without missing a beat.

His age and experience of life give him wisdom and wit and this is evident on every page of the book. The thing that came across to me as a reader was his passion for every aspect of his life. Be this in his fandom of pop music, playing live, recording, or his family and friends. His descriptions of the live and recorded perfection he strives for are thoroughly absorbing. Its not just a load of rock n' roll stories and anecdotes (although there are some belters), its Bruce writing about Bruce. Some of the later chapters in which he is candid about his relationship with his father and his own ongoing battle with depression were very moving and I applaud his honesty and respect that this shows for a reader who chooses to invest time in reading about the life of Bruce Springsteen. In the final analysis its a great book by a great guy. Thanks Man!

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Butts
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Predctably, I loved it.

His description of the onset of his depression is astounding in the way he nuances his thoughts and captures the grey areas of the illness so sensitively. I was reminded when reading that passage of his song, Brilliant Disguise.

Similarly, his childhood is fascinating. The bit where he describes being at the top of the tree, looking down on his 'buddies', hearing the chatter from high and then gazing off to the distance is Hemingway-esque.

I think he's done anybody with daddy issues immense favours. All parents do their best with what ever they have at their disposal at any given time. By rising above the stuff that affected him he was also able to fix it, and finally bring his damaged dad along with him to some kind of reconciliation.

I didn't think he cculd go any further up in my estimation but every syllable of this book does that. Comfortably the best music autobiog I've read to date.
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Dock
He's the Keeper of the Fire

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Butts wrote:
Predctably, I loved it.

His description of the onset of his depression is astounding in the way he nuances his thoughts and captures the grey areas of the illness so sensitively. I was reminded when reading that passage of his song, Brilliant Disguise.

Similarly, his childhood is fascinating. The bit where he describes being at the top of the tree, looking down on his 'buddies', hearing the chatter from high and then gazing off to the distance is Hemingway-esque.

I think he's done anybody with daddy issues immense favours. All parents do their best with what ever they have at their disposal at any given time. By rising above the stuff that affected him he was also able to fix it, and finally bring his damaged dad along with him to some kind of reconciliation.

I didn't think he cculd go any further up in my estimation but every syllable of this book does that. Comfortably the best music autobiog I've read to date.


I agree with all that Butts. Its such a personal book. A lot of the time the music 'biz' takes a backseat and we get him talking to us about really personal things. The Father/Son stuff was brilliant.
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