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Dock

Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte

Wuthering Heights is usually found under the genre of 'Classics'. That term can mean different things to different people. What it means to me personally as a reader is a story that stands the test of time and was written with a use of language and style that nails a new readers attention. Enter Miss Bronte. Apart from visits to Haworth I have never read anything by the Bronte sisters and know nada about them. WU is Mrs. D's alltime favorite novel and as it was free on the Kindle I thought I would give it a go.

It is the tale of two families who live on the moors of West Yorkshire in the mid to late 18th century. The Earnshaws and the Lintons. The story begins with a beguiling opening chapter in which Mr. Lockwood, a newcomer to the area, visits his new landlord Mr. Heathcliff at his home Wuthering Heights and describes the very seemingly odd family living within. (for a modern dysfunctional family parallel I think you could compare it to Iain Banks 'Wasp Factory'). After an overnight stay at WU Mr. Lockwood returns to his rented home and discusses his stay with his housekeeper Ellen Dean. The books narrative is then taken over by Ellen Dean who, after being in service to both the Earnshaws and the Lintons for many a year, is well equipped to tell Lockwood of the strange and tragic story of the two families across the previous decades including story of Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, and for me, Ellen Dean is the best character in the book.

I enjoyed WU and would recommend it to anybody who enjoys good fiction. Even though I am a staunch advocate of reading books set in areas and era's that are unfamiliar to you, the fact that I had some local knowledge of the moors and the seasonal changes of the weather in that area of Yorkshire really added to my reading experience of Emily Bronte's atmospheric descriptions of the harshness and extremities of what life would have been like for the characters living in country dwellings in that era. A great read and one thats as gothic as a Sisters of Mercy convention in Transylvania. Brill stuff!
bearing

What's WU?

Out on the smelly, Ponte Carlo streets
We'd roll and fall into pubs
You had a temper, like my jealousy
Too drunk, too greedy
How could you leave me?
When I needed to possess you?
I hated you, I loved you too

Bad dreams in the night
They told me I was going to lose the fight
Leave behind my Pontefract, Pontefract
Pontefract Heights

sheepsy, its me, Docky come home
I'm so cold, let me in-a-your window
Forest

*applauds bearing*
Dock

bearing wrote:
What's WU?

Out on the smelly, Ponte Carlo streets
We'd roll and fall into pubs
You had a temper, like my jealousy
Too drunk, too greedy
How could you leave me?
When I needed to possess you?
I hated you, I loved you too

Bad dreams in the night
They told me I was going to lose the fight
Leave behind my Pontefract, Pontefract
Pontefract Heights

sheepsy, its me, Docky come home
I'm so cold, let me in-a-your window


Soz Bearing. It should have read WH not WU. Don't know what happened there, but I'm sure most people could work out what I meant to say.











































































It was just you who couldn't. You thick bastard!
Nyles O Cranium

Applauds Dock

Interestingly, despite all the recent hype as it's a proper Yorkshire film by Yorkshire people (Heathcliff's black in it) I was told the latest film adaptation was v poor

Got my girlfriend a Kindle so will make sure she downloads Withering Tights
Dock

Nyles O Cranium wrote:
Applauds Dock

Interestingly, despite all the recent hype as it's a proper Yorkshire film by Yorkshire people (Heathcliff's black in it) I was told the latest film adaptation was v poor

Got my girlfriend a Kindle so will make sure she downloads Withering Tights


Happy New Year Codge. I understand there is some debate about Heathcliffs background amongst Bronteittes. This isn't a spoiler, but in the early part of the book Cathys Dad finds the little lad Heathcliff roaming around the streets of Liverpool. Thats the only detail that I can think of that could hint at him being black (the novel is set when slave ships would have been frequent visitors to the port of Liverpool). Most of the descriptions of him in the book hint at him having dark features, and that he could be from gypsy stock.
Late Doors

Its a well known fact that H was a Huddersfield lad. We are all well fancied by Arty free spirited parsons daughter types. Its the rugged mystery of our devilish good looks tha'nos
Dock

Late Doors wrote:
Its a well known fact that H was a Huddersfield lad. We are all well fancied by Arty free spirited parsons daughter types. Its the rugged mystery of our devilish good looks tha'nos


In no part of Wuthering Heights does it mention:

A. That Heathcliff ever had a Saturday job at Big Jack Bogthwaites Tripe Emporium.

B. That Heathcliff ever had a loyalty card for T'Zorba's of Birkby (The Home of the Kebab)

C. That Heathcliff ever had electric gates on his farm

So the above three factual points conclude that your theory of Heathcliff being a native of the Penine Tora Bora Mountains is 100% pifflebobbins.

Sir Bulldog Craggwood

Dock

Nice one Dawg!

I hate to admit it but the amount of times I was reading the book and I would find myself humming that tune as I read the words 'Wuthering Heights' are too many to mention. What a plank! (me, not you like)

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