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fartcatcher

The Men in Black

I've often wondered what motivates anyone to become a ref. For two hours every Saturday you become the embodiment of all that is evil. A traffic warden, auditor, park-keeper, policeman, bouncer, estate agent, inkjet printer manufacturer all rolled into one.

For two hours you are jeered by fans, abused by players, after the game you are criticised by managers and the press. Then everyone forgets you exist until the following Saturday and it all starts again.

I bet the money's rubbish and you don't get many young ladies hanging round your changing rooms after the game either.

A lot of them seem to be bald. Not sure whether this is an entrance qualification or a side effect.
Grind

Re: The Men in Black

fartcatcher wrote:
I've often wondered what motivates anyone to become a ref. For two hours every Saturday you become the embodiment of all that is evil. A traffic warden, auditor, park-keeper, policeman, bouncer, estate agent, inkjet printer manufacturer all rolled into one.

For two hours you are jeered by fans, abused by players, after the game you are criticised by managers and the press. Then everyone forgets you exist until the following Saturday and it all starts again.

I bet the money's rubbish and you don't get many young ladies hanging round your changing rooms after the game either.

A lot of them seem to be bald. Not sure whether this is an entrance qualification or a side effect.


Somewhat coincidentally, I did the four hour recertification course last night so I can referee here for the next year.

I certainly don't make much money out of it (I think I was paid about $6k last year for my efforts - I probably covered three hundred games?) and I do it for a couple of reasons - I still genuinely love the game and enjoy running a match in which everything flows properly and the people involved enjoy themselves and learn to play the sport.

I'm no Howard Webb, but in my youth I played at a surprisingly high level (well, it surprised me), still vaguely play at 48 (I kicked Steve Nichol in anger last year) and have coaching badges (taken ten or so years ago) equivalent to what I'm assuming Simon Grayson must have.

I basically turned to referee late on essentially through the coaching - you'd be surprised how many subtle tweaks there are in the laws of the game that can be exploited by players and teams that know what they're doing.

It still makes me wonder why more genuine fans (and professional players) don't bother to do a refereeing course if only to fully acquaint themselves with the laws of the game. I know it was a pretty shite match, but it seemed like I was explaining what was going on at the Bradford LC fixture to those around me - and these are blokes who've been to a thousand or more matches. Weird.

Once you have done the refereeing course, the body language of the various officials on the pitch leaps out at you and, although they don't always get calls correct, you can see how their thought processes are working.

Much like how the players move if you've immersed yourself in coaching.

Every young player I'ver ever had has been told to qualify as a referee at the earliest opportunity.

* Realises he's done a sensible post. *

** Oh well, it had to happen eventually, eh? **

*** It's true that Grind can only really see out of one eye, but he does have a luxuriant head of hair. ***
Heyho

I'd still like to know why there is such a gulf between football and RL (and RU) with regards to the 'respect' from on the pitch for the ref. He is still called sir in RL and players just get on with the game.

Ok so there is just a little bit of petulance and questioning coning into RL from the players when a ref makes a bad decision but very little.
Frazier Cranium

Often it's power and ego that motivates them, though I have met lots of really pleasant referees during my pub team career.  Met some right over-opinionated jerks too of course.

Mike Riley once refereed a match with our team involved - he looked like a wimp who couldn't officiate a game of solitaire but he was superb.
Dock

My Dad did a reffing course. He was a prison officer. It does seem to attract coppers, teachers, and screws. As Fraz says, its a bit of a power thing. And its not the best thing to be if you ref a side that has my old mate Bradford Paul playing in it cos' he has punched at least three, and headbutted one in his time. Nice lad, honest.
bearing

Re: The Men in Black

Grind wrote:
fartcatcher wrote:
I've often wondered what motivates anyone to become a ref. For two hours every Saturday you become the embodiment of all that is evil. A traffic warden, auditor, park-keeper, policeman, bouncer, estate agent, inkjet printer manufacturer all rolled into one.

For two hours you are jeered by fans, abused by players, after the game you are criticised by managers and the press. Then everyone forgets you exist until the following Saturday and it all starts again.

I bet the money's rubbish and you don't get many young ladies hanging round your changing rooms after the game either.

A lot of them seem to be bald. Not sure whether this is an entrance qualification or a side effect.


Somewhat coincidentally, I did the four hour recertification course last night so I can referee here for the next year.

I certainly don't make much money out of it (I think I was paid about $6k last year for my efforts - I probably covered three hundred games?) and I do it for a couple of reasons - I still genuinely love the game and enjoy running a match in which everything flows properly and the people involved enjoy themselves and learn to play the sport.

I'm no Howard Webb, but in my youth I played at a surprisingly high level (well, it surprised me), still vaguely play at 48 (I kicked Steve Nichol in anger last year) and have coaching badges (taken ten or so years ago) equivalent to what I'm assuming Simon Grayson must have.

I basically turned to referee late on essentially through the coaching - you'd be surprised how many subtle tweaks there are in the laws of the game that can be exploited by players and teams that know what they're doing.

It still makes me wonder why more genuine fans (and professional players) don't bother to do a refereeing course if only to fully acquaint themselves with the laws of the game. I know it was a pretty shite match, but it seemed like I was explaining what was going on at the Bradford LC fixture to those around me - and these are blokes who've been to a thousand or more matches. Weird.

Once you have done the refereeing course, the body language of the various officials on the pitch leaps out at you and, although they don't always get calls correct, you can see how their thought processes are working.

Much like how the players move if you've immersed yourself in coaching.

Every young player I'ver ever had has been told to qualify as a referee at the earliest opportunity.

* Realises he's done a sensible post. *

** Oh well, it had to happen eventually, eh? **

*** It's true that Grind can only really see out of one eye, but he does have a luxuriant head of hair. ***


Haha, brilliant post.  Got to be one of your funniest.
Grind

Re: The Men in Black

bearing wrote:
Grind wrote:
fartcatcher wrote:
I've often wondered what motivates anyone to become a ref. For two hours every Saturday you become the embodiment of all that is evil. A traffic warden, auditor, park-keeper, policeman, bouncer, estate agent, inkjet printer manufacturer all rolled into one.

For two hours you are jeered by fans, abused by players, after the game you are criticised by managers and the press. Then everyone forgets you exist until the following Saturday and it all starts again.

I bet the money's rubbish and you don't get many young ladies hanging round your changing rooms after the game either.

A lot of them seem to be bald. Not sure whether this is an entrance qualification or a side effect.


Somewhat coincidentally, I did the four hour recertification course last night so I can referee here for the next year.

I certainly don't make much money out of it (I think I was paid about $6k last year for my efforts - I probably covered three hundred games?) and I do it for a couple of reasons - I still genuinely love the game and enjoy running a match in which everything flows properly and the people involved enjoy themselves and learn to play the sport.

I'm no Howard Webb, but in my youth I played at a surprisingly high level (well, it surprised me), still vaguely play at 48 (I kicked Steve Nichol in anger last year) and have coaching badges (taken ten or so years ago) equivalent to what I'm assuming Simon Grayson must have.

I basically turned to referee late on essentially through the coaching - you'd be surprised how many subtle tweaks there are in the laws of the game that can be exploited by players and teams that know what they're doing.

It still makes me wonder why more genuine fans (and professional players) don't bother to do a refereeing course if only to fully acquaint themselves with the laws of the game. I know it was a pretty shite match, but it seemed like I was explaining what was going on at the Bradford LC fixture to those around me - and these are blokes who've been to a thousand or more matches. Weird.

Once you have done the refereeing course, the body language of the various officials on the pitch leaps out at you and, although they don't always get calls correct, you can see how their thought processes are working.

Much like how the players move if you've immersed yourself in coaching.

Every young player I'ver ever had has been told to qualify as a referee at the earliest opportunity.

* Realises he's done a sensible post. *

** Oh well, it had to happen eventually, eh? **

*** It's true that Grind can only really see out of one eye, but he does have a luxuriant head of hair. ***


Haha, brilliant post.  Got to be one of your funniest.


Bastard!  

I think the only thing I might add is that it can be quite a buzz if you're involved in a tight game as long as you don't blow it. I've always been of the opinion referees are there to make the game flow properly and should only mysteriously appear like Mr Ben if trouble or confusion develops.

I was never going to actively rise up the ranks as I would rather play or watch professional footie (Leeds, natch) on my weekends. I would say 95% or more of the games I cover are indoor adult 6v6 or 8v8 games during weeknights. Kids games irritate me - often because of the idiot parents.

Most of the higher level referees I've come across have, unfortunately, tended to be tools. Very few of the senior US referees could kick a ball straight if they tried, which seems wrong to me.

* Applies to become state trooper. *
Grind

fartcatcher

Spookily enough I met this bloke down the Social Club Friday who had reffed up to Midland Combination level (or whatever they call it now).

He said the best games to ref are the youth teams of the non-league clubs. Very talented kids, playing largely without inhibition.  
The worst were when he was starting out. Kids teams, with the mums and dads (and managers), most of whom know nothing about the game, screaming and effing and blinding at him, the opposition and even their own sons/daughters.

He was bald though. Complete slaphead.
Grind

Just got roped into covering middle school games on Monday and Thursday afternoons/evenings.

Bollocks.  
bearing

Great film

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