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Dock

The Life of Mahatma Gandhi - Louis Fischer

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (the prefix of the word Mahatma meaning ‘Great Soul’ came later in life) was, it could be strongly stated, the last great leader of people in the world who never raised a hand in anger, but still managed to debilitate and remove from his country one of the most powerful empires in the history of the planet.

Louis Fischer’s biography was first published in the early 1950’s and still reads brilliantly. In a rather exotic career as a foreign correspondent for newspapers such as the New York Times in the first part of the last century he reported on the new communism in Russia, the Spanish civil war, the rise of the Nazis, but out of all of those things and many more he covered it seems the thing that really inspired him was interviewing and becoming friends with a small old man from India.

The book is in short very readable chapters. We start from day one of the Mahatma’s life and then Fischer describes how the young lawyer first became active in civil rights for his immigrant countrymen in South Africa and then we are brought back to India and the beginning of Gandhi’s Satyagraha (civil resistance) movement in which by peaceful means he mobilised hundreds of millions of Indians against the illegal occupation of the British Government. Gandhi’s power is the like of I have never read about before. He bridged divides between religions, politics, nations and was sought out for advice by artists, royalty, peasants, and politicians. I could go into more detail but that’s for the future reader to find out for themselves and its hard to include in a review the many interesting aspects covered in the book.  

Gandhi’s life makes for a great read, most notably because the events in it are so extraordinary but at the same time real. Fischer details the history of India and the occupation of the British, the good and bad of the two most prominent religions of India (Hindu’s and Muslims), and how the infighting of Indian against Indian delayed Independence for their nation as a whole. In the middle of it all was a man who believed in the good of people and had an unyielding faith in humanity and for people to realise the error and horror of oppression and violence towards their fellow human beings. Gandhi’s beliefs are as relevant today as they ever were. I could go on and on but I won’t. What I will say is this is a great biography of a truly great man. For me personally this has been a life changer of a read and has given me a few new designs for my own life and the way I look at  the world. This book has altered my head.
Late Doors

Your not going to get all peaceful on us are you  enjoyed that, made me want to read it.

Gandhi’s beliefs are as relevant today as they ever were  

Indeed
Grind

I'm still not drinking a pint of my own piss.

* A half is more than enough.
Sir Bulldog Craggwood

Dock

Late Doors wrote:
Your not going to get all peaceful on us are you  enjoyed that, made me want to read it.

Gandhi’s beliefs are as relevant today as they ever were  

Indeed


Peaceful? Me? Get fucked!

I think what I meant was his belief in the power of self. That you need to be happy yourself before you can benefit others. And another thing was that old MG was a right frugal dougal. He didn't believe in expensive materialistic junk. He lived on very little means and was still happy.

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