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Late Doors

The Kirklees Way

If youre not familiar with the area of Kirklees (and why would you be?, even the people who live in it dont know what it is) its what used to be known in old money as the Heavy Woolen area. Its essentially Huddersfield, Brighouse, Dewsbury, Mirfield, Batley and that area east of Huddersfield that is neither Leeds Or Bradford collectively known as Cleckheckmondsedge .

The Kirklees Way is a 70 mile walkway around the perimeter along the borders with Halifax, Bradford, Leeds, Wakefield, Barnsley the Peak District and the Pennines. Its conveniently divided into twelve sections averaging about 6 miles each and this year we said wed do it all by the year end. Did the 7th stretch on Sunday so were well on track.

Anyway the point about all this foot based and indeed verbal rambling  is that walking is ace. Weve seen so much of our local area following the trail that we never even knew existed. Seen brilliant views and its really hit home what a lovely part of the world we live in. These last three stages have gone from Clifton in Brighouse to Birkenshaw almost in Bradford right down to Hanging Heaton in Batley.

We knew the West part of the walk and the south would be beautiful but weve seen some really nice areas full of rural charm and industrial and agricultural heritage down the East Side. The views west towards Huddersfield and the Pennines have been amongst the best in Yorkshire (and therefore the world ) with Emley Moor, Castle hill, Holme Moss and Pole Moor dominant from every angle. I can post some pictures if anyones interested

Another point is to big up everyone connected with creating these public footpaths maintaining them and lobbying for more, particularly the excellent Ramblers Association. Anyone else enjoy a local walk of theirs
Dock

Misunderstood the thread title, I was always led to believe that The Kirklees way was to drink ten pints of Best Bitter in Carlinghow W.M.C., punch a commitee member, and take your snooker cue home in disgust at the price of t'subs. Well, it was in my family.

Seriously though LD, I'd never heard of it. Good post. And can I pick you up just a tad on your spelling. Hanging Heaton should be: Angin' eaton if you are to say it as the locals say it.

Re: Anyone else enjoying a local walk. Personally, I love the Leeds/Liverpool canal. Clear as a millpond.
Pond Life

Re: The Kirklees Way

Late Doors wrote:


Another point is to big up everyone connected with creating these public footpaths maintaining them and lobbying for more, particularly the excellent Ramblers Association. Anyone else enjoy a local walk of theirs


Good point well made, famous pop stars and other fuckwits try to ride rough shod over them hoping no one will notice.
Forest

Was in Upper Hopton yesterday, absolutely luvverly.
Late Doors

Indeed F. My old Cycling land when i lived in that neck o't'woods
Late Doors

We did the Hanging Heaton, soryy anging Eetn to Thornhill stage on Saturday. This was always going to be the dodgy stage for me. Its the area I know least about taking in the charms of Both Batley and Dewsbury. I wondered how they were going to make the walk charming but we were both mildly but pleasantly surprised. There were some great views and interesting pockets of it but we had a bit of a set back in Dewsbury Town center as the forums favourite Romany type travellers with their cheery disposition saw fit to plonk themselves right on the route . It was not a welcoming site that greeted us at all and in fact we made a detour round it meeting up with the trail a bit further nearer the river Calder by the football fields there.

Again there were some fantastic views including Batleys Golden Mile and West towards Huddersfield and the Pennines with Emley Moor Mast dominant.





A bit of the walk was on a now dismantled Railway track. More and more of these old tracks are being re invented as greenways for walkers and bikers and the excellent sustrans organization needs some recognition for this. A lovely stretch of the Calder and Navigation canal provided a nice aquatic scenery change with the serenity only disturbed by the barrage of Gately jokes flying into my phone. (edited, no that was Sundays walk   )


Finished off going along Thornhill Edge and finally at the flatt top pub.
Not the pretties stage of the walk by any means but interesting all the same. Quite a few of the way markers seemed to be missing and the guide book wasnt too clear at times so we lost our way a bit. Still seemed to get back on track though after the slight detours so it wasnt a problem. Next stage Thornhill to Dearne valley Into more familiar territory
Late Doors

Did the Thornhill Edge to Dearne valley stretch yesterday. Wed enjoyed the Eastern legs but now wed reached the Southern section it was back into the rural splendour that makes up the vast perimeter of Kirklees and leave behind the Shoddy Mungo areas of Dewsbury-Batley.

Started where we ended the last one at the Flatt Tops Pub which always has me thinking its populated by 80s Rockabillies and carried on along Thornhill Edge.

There were wonderful views along the valley, towards Emley Moor and the Autumn Light lit up the bracken with a rustic intensity you only get at certain times of the year. I tell thee, October is the most photogenic month.






Then it was down across the valley heading generally towards Flockton and Denby Dale. Well this was more like it. Id say apart from the brevity of it this walk was pretty much perfect, it had everything. 5.5 miles is a little short of the optimum length for us around 9 miles but we can always do it there and back next time.

There were babbling becks brooks and streams and remnants of old water powered mills. Agriculture, both modern and ancient, tremendous views, wildlife, farm animals, Horses, Pheasants, distant gun shots, deciduous and evergreen trees, autumnal foliage, interesting stiles, meadows, stone walls, grand stately country houses and peppered with little curiosities throughout. Wonderful.






Next up Dearne Valley to Lower Cumberworth
Dock

Late Doors wrote:
Did the Thornhill Edge to Dearne valley stretch yesterday. Wed enjoyed the Eastern legs but now wed reached the Southern section it was back into the rural splendour that makes up the vast perimeter of Kirklees and leave behind the Shoddy Mungo areas of Dewsbury-Batley.

Started where we ended the last one at the Flatt Tops Pub which always has me thinking its populated by 80s Rockabillies and carried on along Thornhill Edge.

There were wonderful views along the valley, towards Emley Moor and the Autumn Light lit up the bracken with a rustic intensity you only get at certain times of the year. I tell thee, October is the most photogenic month.






Then it was down across the valley heading generally towards Flockton and Denby Dale. Well this was more like it. Id say apart from the brevity of it this walk was pretty much perfect, it had everything. 5.5 miles is a little short of the optimum length for us around 9 miles but we can always do it there and back next time.

There were babbling becks brooks and streams and remnants of old water powered mills. Agriculture, both modern and ancient, tremendous views, wildlife, farm animals, Horses, Pheasants, distant gun shots, deciduous and evergreen trees, autumnal foliage, interesting stiles, meadows, stone walls, grand stately country houses and peppered with little curiosities throughout. Wonderful.






Next up Dearne Valley to Lower Cumberworth


Sold! Where would be a good spot to park up and start walking LD?
Late Doors

You mean a proper walk or a Head O Steam to Wetherspoons one   .

A central position for that last section would be in Flockton. You can go North to Thornhill or South Towards Scissett. A map would be usefull but the way is pretty well marked with the Kirklees way arrows. Have a look at this

http://www.kirkleesway.co.uk/

particularly the Kirklees way google map
Dock

Late Doors wrote:
You mean a proper walk or a Head O Steam to Wetherspoons one .

A central position for that last section would be in Flockton. You can go North to Thornhill or South Towards Scissett. A map would be usefull but the way is pretty well marked with the Kirklees way arrows. Have a look at this

http://www.kirkleesway.co.uk/

particularly the Kirklees way google map


I'll have you know that I'm a keen rambler. If you look at the Pennine way thread, I'm planning on doing the aforementioned walk with those two halfheads Lebowski and T'Bearing.
bearing

Dock wrote:
Late Doors wrote:
You mean a proper walk or a Head O Steam to Wetherspoons one .

A central position for that last section would be in Flockton. You can go North to Thornhill or South Towards Scissett. A map would be usefull but the way is pretty well marked with the Kirklees way arrows. Have a look at this

http://www.kirkleesway.co.uk/

particularly the Kirklees way google map


I'll have you know that I'm a keen rambler. If you look at the Pennine way thread, I'm planning on doing the aforementioned walk with those two halfheads Lebowski and T'Bearing.


Yes he's our very own Wainwrong!  
Mol

Be careful out there LD.

A MAN has described his shock at finding the severed head of an alligator while walking his dogs in West Yorkshire.
Peter Lumb, 59, of Huddersfield, found the skull and a section of the reptile's jaw while out with his two border collies on a hillside in the Crosland Moor area.

He said: "I was a bit shocked to find them, a bit taken aback. I was thinking 'What
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the hell are they doing there?"'

The bones were checked out by experts at Manchester Museum, where his daughter Catherine works, and were found to be those of an American alligator, usually found in the south-eastern United States.

Fragments of skin found with the bones indicated they had not been there long before they were discovered.

The museum said the remains belonged to an alligator that could have been 6ft long without its tail.

Rebecca Machin, curatorial assistant of natural environments at the museum, said: "What's odd about it is the back of the head is sawn off, and it looks like someone sawed it off after it died.

"It looks like it has been butchered."

A Kirklees Council spokesman said: "Kirklees currently has no dangerous animals registered and we can only assume that somebody has been keeping the alligator, which grew too big to be looked after safely."

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