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Dock

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain (Kindle Edition)

I read Tom Sawyer ages ago so this is a re-read for me. But as this was my first foray into this Kindle malarkey I thought Iíd go with a book and author whose style I know. Liken it if you will to taking an old and trusted friend to an awkward hospital appointment.

First things first. TAOTS is the joy of a tale that I remember. Accessible for any adult who has ever been a kid (thatíll be everyone then). Mark Twain is razor sharp when it comes to wit, sarcasm, and a keen eye for the human condition and uses this with full force in this excellent book. The hopes, fears, and joys of being a kid fill every page and the conversations between its supremo scallywag Tom and his partners in crime Huck Finn and Joe Harper are brilliantly told and are the like of which we have all had as junior naÔve dreamers. A book that could be related to and enjoyed by readers in Warsaw, Sao Paulo, Inverness or anywhere else on the planet. A universal and timeless classic.

Now on to this Kindle business. Mrs. D got one of the first ones that was available to buy but I in my blissful Ludditeness have shunned it and have defended my beloved print and paperbacks against this digital satan but this year as I read more and more positive things about kindles I thought I should at least give it a go. Know thy enemy and all that. Iím sure many are already aware but a lot of books that are out of copyright (Like Mr. Twainís stuff) are available to download for nothing so there was really no reason not to take a leap of faith into the world of the ebook.

As I started reading on the kindle it felt a bit like reading a text message, but after a few pages it became very natural. The font was of a very readable style and size and the screen has no glare. One of my fears had been that it would be a strain on the eyes but this is not the case and I found I would read more in a sitting than I would with a printed paperback. The design and shape of the kindle make it easier to read than a paperback because you donít need as much elbow room so its ideal on a bus or train. One of the big advantages of it for me personally, because I spend all of my dinner hour reading, is that you can lay it flat on a table and read whilst you eat which can be a bit of a pain when you are trying to eat a sarnie and are simultaneously wrestling with a fecking great big 600 pager of a paperback.

So to sum up, even though I enjoyed the reading experience of a kindle and will be treating myself to one in the new year, I fundamentally believe that there is room for both print and ebooks. One of the downsides to the Kindle is that a lot of new books still cost more or less the same as their printed versions but you are only getting a download instead of the physical product of a paperback which is a bit of a rip off in my opinion. †Also for me, the printed novel is †one of the greatest things in the history of the human race, and the feel of a weighty book and the crease of the spine has a charm that canít be quantified. Both formats will be a part of my future reading habits so hereís a toast to both the old and the new. Cheers!

TíKindle stuff I have downloaded for my next ebook adventures (all for nowt as well):

The American Ė Henry James

Wuthering Heights Ė Emily Bronte

A Popular History of Ireland : from the Earliest Period to the Emancipation of the Catholics - Volume 2 Ė Thomas DíArcy McGee*

*Then again I might not bother to read that last one and just wait for the Hollywood blockbuster to hit the big screen.
bearing

Fuck me the last one sounds riveting Dock.

I've put a Kindle on my Christmas list, similarly to you I have shunned it due to my love of the printed book but whilst travelling I reckon it will be a boon, no need to haul a dozen books away on holiday and as you say easy to read on the bus or train.

Had a bit of a play with one in PC World the other day and found it quite pleasant to use.

Tom Sawyer will be on my list Dock however I'll probably give the Ireland one a miss...
Grind

While travelling it could even be a Mills & Boon.

We have one here too - I've not set the fecker up yet.
Dock

bearing wrote:
Fuck me the last one sounds riveting Dock.

I've put a Kindle on my Christmas list, similarly to you I have shunned it due to my love of the printed book but whilst travelling I reckon it will be a boon, no need to haul a dozen books away on holiday and as you say easy to read on the bus or train.

Had a bit of a play with one in PC World the other day and found it quite pleasant to use.

Tom Sawyer will be on my list Dock however I'll probably give the Ireland one a miss...


Tom Sawyer is great and I can recommend The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The latter being my favorite of the two. Both in this collection. The complete works for next to nowt. I was going to get it but I felt like I was nicking cos' its so bloody cheap so decided on only the one novel.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Complete-...TF8&qid=1323019874&sr=1-2
Dock

I got 56% (that'll be just over half then) of the Henry James' 'The American'. I tried with it but t'were dull and numbing and not worth a thread on its own. It was basically the tail of Christopher Newman, a wealthy American living in Paris at the end of the 19th century and his courting of a woman from a French aristocratic background. The dialogue was flowery and tedious and the characterisation was flatter than my wallet after a day at t'races. A lot of people rate it from what I have read in reviews but it wasn't for me.

Same with the popular history of Ireland. It was written in the mid-1800's and is pretty outdated compared to other histories I have read. Plus the fact that Thomas D'Arcy McGee was a total catholic whackjob didn't bode well for the book to be a balanced overview. I gave it up a third of the way through.

So my first two freebies were not up to much but I am halfway through 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte and its a 24 carat belter of a novel and will get its own review. That is all.
Nyles O Cranium

Have you read The Turn of the Screw?  That's Henry James too isn't it?  Very good book, if you know the film (which I did/do) and if you don't, still worth a read.
Dock

Nyles O Cranium wrote:
Have you read The Turn of the Screw? †That's Henry James too isn't it? †Very good book, if you know the film (which I did/do) and if you don't, still worth a read.


*makes note* Ta Codge!
Nyles O Cranium

I had to read it in one night and compare it to the screenplay adaptation the next morning.  As was often the case, my opinion was different to the rest of the students' and the lecturer's too.  The counts

It all boils down to - in the book AND the film (The Innocents, one of my all time faves) - is the main character bonkers or really haunted?  

I struggle to think of a better adaptation ever than the Deborah Kerr film  
Cutsyke

Downloaded Tom Sawyer, fecking brilliant writing. Spunk Water, Dead Cat Wart Cures sounds like the doctors on Medicare

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