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fartcatcher

Pub Rock

Very little of the music of the early seventies appealed to me. Most of the great British (and American) bands of the sixties had split up - or disappeared up their own backsides as a result of excessive use of consciousness expanding chemicals. The charts, both single and album, were dominated by glam, with it's preening egotists covered in lycra, sequins and eye shadow, Philadelphia soul with it's fatuous lyrics, and falsetto singing, and prog rock - interminable tune free guitar solos and grandiose themed albums.

Pub Rock kept me going. The bands played for nothing, or next to nothing, they were loud and swore a lot, and they wore the same sort of clothes as 'normal people'.

Amongst the best were Ducks Deluxe.


bearing

Is he singing the same song that himself and the band are playing?
Plastic Man

I grew up in London in the mid-70s and Pub Rock was a big scene, and a personal major musical influence.

Proper R'n'B - rhythm and blues as it was meant to be.

Not some shite, self-centred, wet blanket wailing that they now call R and B.

Unfortunately I was a bit too young to be able fully immerse myself into the mainstream scene at the time, but at 14/15 I was able to see some bands in local pubs. Sadly I never got to see Dr Feelgood, posibly my all-time favourite pub rock band, but did end up seeing and interviewing probably the next best thing, Nine Below Zero.

(As an aside, while at college, my mate Tony was the music editor for the student newspaper, the Birmingham Sun. It was originally called the "Sun" short for "student union news". Legend has it that the commercial paper paid a handsome amount to the student union to secure the naming right, hence the change of name for the student paper.

I managed to persuade Tony to swap and put me and my mate Colin (as the photographer) on the guest list for the Nine Below Zero gig at the college in return for providing a review.

There is something magical about being on a guest list.

We swanned in, and even signed in a couple of non-student locals, who were desperate to get in, as a magnanimous gesture. "Yeah, they're with us..."

The reality of what I needed to provide in terms of a review dawned on me.

My knowledge of the band's oeuvre was rather flaky.

And my photographer didn't even own a camera.

So I did what I thought was sensible, and talked to the bouncer on their dressing room door. I told him I was from the Birmingham Sun and asked if it was possible to have a quick chat with the band.

He disappeared into the dressing room (a slightly over-sized cupboard) and returned with good news that they were happy to talk with me.

Colin and I entered the room, to be faced with the rather off-putting sight of the four of them mooning at us.

After a few moments I asked what had prompted such an unusual welcome.

"Cos yer from the Sun, inya."

I explained how the misunderstanding had arisen.

How we all laughed!

When I explained that I that didn't have a clue what I was supposed to be doing, they effectively interviewed themselves to provide me sufficient information.

A top bunch of lads.

And appearing soon with Stranglers in Leeds, I believe. I need to investigate further...)
fartcatcher

I saw Nine Below Zero when I was working at the CBS Records pressing plant in Aylesbury. They played on the shop floor as a way of saying thank you to the workers. Dennis Greaves had very bad teeth - not sure if he's had them fixed yet.

They were very good.

T'b

Sean Tyla was generally insensible through drink by the end of the set. Bass player Nick Garvey frequently had to step in on the last verse when Sean was 'tiring'.

Here's Stafford's finest for you. Bit too much hair to be proper pub rock but a good song nevertheless

Frazier Cranium

Hope to be seeing, amongst others, Dr Feelgood, Wilko Johnson, 9 Below Zero, next weekend.

Can't tell you any more, it's hush hush.
Plastic Man

Frazier Cranium wrote:
Hope to be seeing, amongst others, Dr Feelgood, Wilko Johnson, 9 Below Zero, next weekend.

Can't tell you any more, it's hush hush.


You can tell me - I won't tell anyone.
Nyles O Cranium

Plastic Man wrote:
Frazier Cranium wrote:
Hope to be seeing, amongst others, Dr Feelgood, Wilko Johnson, 9 Below Zero, next weekend.

Can't tell you any more, it's hush hush.


You can tell me - I won't tell anyone.


Hi Di Hi!
fartcatcher

If I could go back in time, this is where i would go

Philwear

Check out first ever episode of The Young Ones (Demolition) ... Nine Below Zero doing Eleven Plus Eleven
Plastic Man

Philwear wrote:
Check out first ever episode of The Young Ones (Demolition) ... Nine Below Zero doing Eleven Plus Eleven


I clearly remember them appearing on the Young Ones. It was around the time of the peak of their relatively brief intensive public exposure when they seemed to be on the telly all the time.
bearing

fartcatcher wrote:
I saw Nine Below Zero when I was working at the CBS Records pressing plant in Aylesbury. They played on the shop floor as a way of saying thank you to the workers. Dennis Greaves had very bad teeth - not sure if he's had them fixed yet.

They were very good.

T'b

Sean Tyla was generally insensible through drink by the end of the set. Bass player Nick Garvey frequently had to step in on the last verse when Sean was 'tiring'.

Here's Stafford's finest for you. Bit too much hair to be proper pub rock but a good song nevertheless



Derek Holt was one of my customers, as was his son. He used to run the Grapes pub which was and still is the best place for live music in Stafford. Derek used to have jam sessions in there when he was landlord.
bearing

Philwear wrote:
Check out first ever episode of The Young Ones (Demolition) ... Nine Below Zero doing Eleven Plus Eleven


That was a great song, I vividly remember his bad teeth.
Late Doors

  PMs story,

Got a great double album, live at the Hope and Anchor, classic Pub Rock, even got the Stranglers on it, and Steel Pulse if my memory serves me right, who may not be a pub band as we know it. Although playing in a pub makes you a pub band doesnt it . *has think* maybe not
Young Marxist at Tescos

"Even The Stranglers..." Argued with a lot of people about this. To me, they WERE pub rock. Old blokes climbing on the pink bandwagon.
A few decent tunes but nothing other than pub rock
Nyles O Cranium

I think you might mean PUNK bandwagon, the pink bandwagon is a completely different er beast

Yes, The Strangs definitely emerged from pub rock, they've never denied it, but they had a bit more style and variety - probably the Hammond organ that did it - to progress further, but the Punk phenomenon absolutley bloody helped them.  They worked their bollocks off too though, touring all around the UK when plenty of bands wouldn't leave the M25 area
bearing

Pink bandwaggon

*sniggers*

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