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Dock

Dublin

Just booked for two nights early September. Love Cork and Galway, but have never ventured to D as have heard about loads of pissed English people spoiling the atmos. Staying in Dublin 2 post code. Any must see places? Can I still find a genuine Dublin pub, that isn't too 'Oirish' in the touristy sense?
Pond Life

I've been there a couple of times, i'm sure there are some real pubs nut i didn't find any i had to get out of Dublin before i found them easily.

It's a tourist town I'm afraid. I would recommend the Guinness brewery tour. I know everyone does it but it is very interesting at you get a lovely pint with a great view.
Mol

I'll get back to you on this, but you should have done Galway again.
Plastic Man

Not one that might automatically spring to mind, but Kilmainham Gaol, now a museum, is worth a visit. It held many of those most involved in the struggle for Irish independence. The guided tour provides a sobering reminder of the fate of some, pointing out the site of execution for several of them.
Dock

Bejesus Clacker, thanks for the tips. Re: The Literary tour. Mrs. Dock did it when she was last there, but has said that it's a must do for me (think she want a couple of hours to go shopping without the usual strain of my tuts and dawdling like).
Dock

Been reading the rough guide. They mention a boozer called The Cobblestone. Supposed to be good for locals doing music sessions nightly. Anyone been?
sheeps

No.
Higgs Boson

One of the most depressing places I've ever been. It was 1998 and it rained non stop for two days, took about four hours to get into town from the airport and we were robbed by some skanky heroin addict. My impression of it was of some giant run down council estate, with a 200m square area of reasonable bars and restaurants plonked in the middle of it all. Step out side the 200m square zone, and its all barefooted kids with streaming noses, beating emaciated ponies with rusting Kestrel Lager cans.
sheeps

2nd dead.
Sir Bulldog Craggwood

got loads of relatives who were born in Dublin - they all variously live in London and Los Angeles these days

i wonder why?
Forest

Go see this in the National Gallery in Dublin (dont think they have a bar)...

Its got a very interesting history.
Dock

Coat, Door, 1916 Easter Uprising!
Pond Life

Look for the tart with the cart.
Pond Life

Reading back through this i have just realised i hit that The Stags Head a few times when i was there. I was in a hotel not far from there, when my travelling companions were off getting a breakfast i was in there getting one of my own.
Sir Bulldog Craggwood

Forest wrote:
Go see this in the National Gallery in Dublin (dont think they have a bar)...

Its got a very interesting history.



Judas' kiss of Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane?

Tell us a bit more fella
Forest

Sir Bullingdon Craggwood wrote:
Forest wrote:
Go see this in the National Gallery in Dublin (dont think they have a bar)...

Its got a very interesting history.



Judas' kiss of Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane?

Tell us a bit more fella


Its title is 'The taking of Christ' by Caravaggio, painted around 1602 and was lost for nearly 400 years until it turned up in a priests home in Dublin in 1993.

By the late 18th century, the painting was thought to have disappeared, and its whereabouts remained unknown for about 200 years. In 1990, Caravaggio’s lost masterpiece was recognized in the residence of the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) in Dublin, Ireland. The exciting rediscovery was published in 1993.

The painting had been hanging in the Dublin Jesuits’ dining room since the early 1930s but had long been considered a copy of the lost original by Gerard van Honthorst, also known as Gherardo della Notte, one of Caravaggio’s Dutch followers. This erroneous attribution had been made while the painting was in the possession of the Roman Mattei family, whose ancestors had originally commissioned it. In 1802, the Mattei sold it, as a work by Honthorst, to William Hamilton Nisbet, in whose home in Scotland it hung until 1921. Later in that decade, the painting was sold to an Irish pediatrician, Marie Lea-Wilson, who eventually donated it in 1934 to the Jesuit Fathers in Dublin, in gratitude for their support following the murder of her husband, Capt. Percival Lea-Wilson a District Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary in Gorey, Co. Wexford, by the Irish Republican Army on 15 June 1920. [1] [2]

The Taking of Christ remained in the Dublin Jesuits' possession for about 60 years, until it was spotted and recognised as at least an old copy of a Caravaggio, in the early 1990s, by Sergio Benedetti, Senior Conservator of the National Gallery of Ireland, while he was visiting the Jesuit Fathers in order to examine a number of paintings for the purposes of restoration. As layers of dirt and discoloured varnish were removed, the high technical quality of the painting was revealed, and it was tentatively identified as Caravaggio’s lost painting.
Dock

Back

Had a great time. It’s already Autumn over there, so the Harrington was fully operational. Good digs (The Grafton Street Hotel, 4 star £140 for double room for three nights), which was very centrally located for everything we wanted to do. As I always do, we checked out some of the things recommended on here, namely The Stags Head (great old Irish boozer), and the Literary Tour. A lot of people may be put off by the title of ‘Literary Tour’, but don’t be. I can’t recommend it strongly enough. We did it on the first night, It lasts around 2 hours, and takes in approx four pubs (Think it was four, but don’t quote me. I’d already had plenty of black pop by this point), and the tour guide is an actor, who tells you about certain writers lives (Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, and many more), and reels off dialogue from some of the writers famous works. Insightful, funny, and a great tour to get you into the Dublin vibe.

Also on the first day we took in The Hugh Lane Gallery on Parnell Square , which houses an impressive collection of works by Monet, Degas, and a unique exhibit of Francis Bacon works, including a fantastic replica of the great mans studio (no admission fee)

The next day we headed off to Kilmainham Gaol, I made the classic male feck up of saying to Mrs. Dock: “Why get a bus, it doesn’t look that far on the map. Lets walk”, anyway, about an hour later, soaked and cold, and Mrs. Dock wearing a look that said ‘KILL’, we started our tour of the prison with an enthusiastic guide called Rosemary. The prison is infamous due to its place in the history of the Republican/Nationalist movement with it been the location for the execution of the organisers of the 1916 Rising. A great history lesson, and worth 6 Euro of anybody’s money.

Next to the Gaol is the Irish Museum of Modern Art housed in the old Royal Hospital. The art was ok, but the building itself is worth a look, and as its next to the gaol, not far to walk to and worth a look in.

Then onto the open top hop on/off tour bus (15 euro for 24 hours), a must do in Dublin, the bus drivers are very knowledgeable, funny, and sarcy bastards to boot.  It takes in all the main parts of the inner city, including the impressive Phoenix Park.

Next up was the Irish Museum of Print (Mrs. Docks idea as she’s in the publishing game). A small museum, but brilliant with a helpful guide called John, and interesting even to a layman like me. Some great old printing presses, the kind of things that Fred Dibner would’ve done a programme about. Ace. The print Museum is located to the south of the city centre in Dublin 4, which we later found out is called Georgian Dublin due to the architecture, and is a great area just to wander around in.

Now, onto the thing you’ve all been wondering about, the pubs.

Went in some great ones, and I was pleasantly surprised to see that the older ones right in the city centre had kept their character/characters, some great names for the pubs, my favourite being ‘Ryans Beggars Bush’. But the only downside to the pubs, was the price of a pint (but every pint was excellently kept Guinness). Every pub on average was charging 5 Euro, which is £5 at the current exchange rate. But that aside, a great trip, and the first one that me and Mrs. Dock have been on together since we met, due to my current fiscal situation, so that made it a bit special. Well, it was special once she’d got over my suggestion of walking through a rough part of West Dublin in the rain for the sole purpose of visiting a now defunct prison like. I think she realises she's hit the Jackpot/Tosspot!

Fin

Enjoyed reading that,thanks for all the info Dock

Glad you both had a great time
Late Doors

That’s ace Dock. I love just touring around cities like that. The literary walk sounds particularly good. The pubs are brilliant aren't they especially on a sunday afternoon

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