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Butts

Christmas food

For all your recipe ideas and favourite things to eat at Christmas.

I'm already planning making a pate and a pork pie and getting loads and loads of cheese.

I'm also doing a goose for the first time, although I probably said that last year and the year before that. This year it's ordered though so it'll happen.
Butts

Rick Stein shows how to cook a goose.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/epis...eins_Cornish_Christmas_Episode_1/
Pond Life

I hear that goose fat is an excellent moisturiser.
Pond Life

loads and loads of cheese
Forest

I've been snacking on home made Christmas cake all week
Butts

Pond Life wrote:
loads and loads of cheese


Is that not enough?
Grind

Mince pies.

Fucking well nom, nom, nom.
Pond Life

Oh i'm sure it will be plenty, I can just hear you say to Mrs Butts, "I'm just off down the shops to buy that loads and loads of cheese i was talking about".
Butts

As importantly I'll need to get those moreish Hovis sweet biscuits. Perfect for a powerful ultra mature Cheddar.
Pond Life

They are nice those!! I forgot about those, they are, as you say, perfect for the job.
Grind

Stop with the food porn right now, you total bastards!
fartcatcher

i am tyrying to cut my cholestorol levekl so i will be having ham salad and a banana
Forest

The Christmas Sandwich

Start with some decent bread that can be sliced,  Ciabatta is a good choice cut diagonally.
Smear the first slice with Mayo* and cover with Turkey and stuffing and cover with another slice of Mayo covered bread.
Next up a decent layer of ham, give it a good dollop of mustard ( got to be Dijon really, other mustards don't compare) and then another slice of bread.
Next another layer of turkey but with a liberal helping of cranberry sauce, finish with the final slice of bread.
Serve with a packet of crisps on the side.


*butter or some other kind of spread can used instead, personally I prefer light mayo

I look forward to this all year, to me this is what Christmas is all about.
Christmas dinner IMHO is just a glorified Sunday lunch.
Butts

Christmas is the only time I make my own mayonnaise, I don't know why it's so easy just takes a bit of whisking and with really fresh eggs it'll last in a jar right through Xmas. It's much more yellow than Hellmans.
Carp

Mrs c has made the mincemeat and makes superb mince
pies
Late Doors

Foz that sarny sounds ace. Is it acceptable to bang a few bits of lettuce in? and use Wholemeal bread. I guess the crisps have to be plain as well.

Any chance of the Goose recipe/ Instructions Butts. Saves me leaving “Doing Geese” on the search records

Other things you only have at chrissy.
Chipolata snags
Sparkly and Orange juice
a smile from the neighbour
lebowski

I'm doing Christmas dinner for 12 this year and the Spuds are going to be cooked in Goose fat, it helps them be crispier.
Forest

Late Doors wrote:
Foz that sarny sounds ace. Is it acceptable to bang a few bits of lettuce in? and use Wholemeal bread. I guess the crisps have to be plain as well.


Obviously whatever goes in is all down to personal choice, after years of experimenting with various foodstuffs, pickles, lettuce, roast beef with horseradish, piccalilli, jalepenos I have finally found a winner.
Wholemeal bread is a good idea, with all that meat you could do with some fibre to be honest.

Yes plain crisps are my choice.
smiling badger

Never tried Goose, imagine that they have a strong taste to them. Are they alot like Duck, taste wise?
Carp

I think the main difference is one honks and the other quacks.
smiling badger

Does that alter the taste then?
Carp

Not sure.
bearing

Carp wrote:
I think the main difference is one honks and the other quacks.


That is the main difference you are right
Carp

I think geese have four legs and ducks only have 2.
bearing

Carp wrote:
I think geese have four legs and ducks only have 2.


Geese have twice as many wings too
Fin

Geese have nostrils low on their beaks.Ducks have nostrils high up on their beaks.Oh and Geese can set video timers.
Carp

You can get a Android app to check the blood pressure of a duck, but not of a goose. Geese don't like Android phones.
bearing

Not much use for geese these days then fin
Fin

bearing wrote:
Not much use for geese these days then fin

No i think their duck is cooked
Butts

lebowski wrote:
I'm doing Christmas dinner for 12 this year and the Spuds are going to be cooked in Goose fat, it helps them be crispier.


The trick, I've learned, is to get the fat smoking hot  - I leave the tin in the oven for about 20 minutes before adding the spuds. After you've par-boiled them, shake them around in the pan as the broken edges help crisp them up and if you get chance, leave them to go cold before putting them in the oven to roast. Don't add any salt.

The beauty of goose or duck fat is that heats to a much higher temp than oil.

It also works very well with parsnips.
Forest

No salt!
Butts

Only after they're cooked. Adding salt before then interferes with the crisping process although you should par boil them in salted water.
Forest

I did not know that, we smother them in salt as they go in the oven as a rule.
Butts

Can't remember where I heard that but it seems to work OK but they're so many conflicting opinions on what is basically just a roast spud. The most important thing is to get the oven really hot which is why I always get the bird done first. I use the Desiree (red) potato also. Carp will know.
Butts

Beginning to panic can't find them anywhere, tried Sainsbury's, Tesco, Co-op. It's going to be a shit Christmas if I can't get any.

Carp

I am told that HFW's digestives are to kill for. Not tried them because Mrs C does most of the baking and has not got round to it. I reckon if he says they are good, then they are.

Re: Spuds. I like King Edward potatoes for chips and roast. Maris Piper is a good all rounder and reds roast well too imo. Comes down to personal choice and technique that works best for one and ones desired end product innit.
Carp

Here ya go.



Click to download file
Butts

Thanks but that's a recipe for an upside down cake
Carp

Sorry about that. If you turn your printer over it should come out the right way up.
Butts

 I'll print it out and turn it the right way up.
Carp

Good luck. If you make them let me know what you think.
Late Doors

Quote:
The beauty of goose or duck fat is that heats to a much higher temp than oil.


seem to remember Mol saying the opposite and he knows a thing or two about spuds  
smiling badger

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail...-secret-perfect-roast-potato.html

Heard this on the Radio and thought that it sounded a bit good.
Butts

smiling badger wrote:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail...-secret-perfect-roast-potato.html

Heard this on the Radio and thought that it sounded a bit good.


I might give that a go, although not on Christmas Day. Not the time to experiment. It makes sense as the trick is to get the fat into the potato to get it crisp, hence the roughing of the edges and the high cooking temperature.
Butts

Butts wrote:
Beginning to panic can't find them anywhere, tried Sainsbury's, Tesco, Co-op. It's going to be a shit Christmas if I can't get any.



Seriously, if anyone see these anywhere (Leeds obviously, although I might stretch to West Yorkshire) will they let me know, please. I've tried everywhere. I'm thinking of buying them on line which for a packet of biscuits seems a bit OTT. Even better, if you see them buy a few packets and I'll collect.

Thanks.
sheeps

Butts wrote:
Butts wrote:
Beginning to panic can't find them anywhere, tried Sainsbury's, Tesco, Co-op. It's going to be a shit Christmas if I can't get any.



Seriously, if anyone see these anywhere (Leeds obviously, although I might stretch to West Yorkshire) will they let me know, please. I've tried everywhere. I'm thinking of buying them on line which for a packet of biscuits seems a bit OTT. Even better, if you see them buy a few packets and I'll collect.

Thanks.


Had a good look round t' Asda Glasshoughton last night, non to be had. Asked shop lass if they sold them, they don't.
Butts

Thanks for that, still no luck even the big Tesco Extra at Seacroft doesn't have them.
bigbone

Booths, Ilkley, have them.How many do you want ?
Carp

Mince pies are good as ever.
sheeps

bigbone wrote:
Booths, Ilkley, have them.How many do you want ?


You can always rely on this lad, he could take over from Foo one day.
Butts

bigbone wrote:
Booths, Ilkley, have them.How many do you want ?


     

Hold on, I'm checking Waitrose tomorrow. I'll text you.
bearing

Butts wrote:
bigbone wrote:
Booths, Ilkley, have them.How many do you want ?


     

Hold on, I'm checking Waitrose tomorrow. I'll text you.


Hada look at Waitrose online, they aren't listed on the site.
Butts

MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!!

You can stand down now BB, Waitrose came through for me.


Fin

Butts wrote:
MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!!

You can stand down now BB, Waitrose came through for me.




It took me ages to work out they were on a worktop and that was drawer fronts i could see i first thought they were on a carpet
bearing

Fin wrote:
Butts wrote:
MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!!

You can stand down now BB, Waitrose came through for me.




It took me ages to work out they were on a worktop and that was drawer fronts i could see i first thought they were on a carpet


I thought it was his landing carpet to begin with, but couldn't work out what was on the top riser.
Butts

The kichen's coming out in the New Year, sick of the drawers not closing and that awful work top colour, might go all stainless steel.
bigbone

Glad you're sorted Butts.
smiling badger

All that lot to be eaten with just cheese?
Butts

I've eaten a packet tonight with this :-


smiling badger

Hope you dont mind me saying, that looks , rancid.
Seem's that you eat more cheese than Wallace and Gromit.
Butts

I suppose it is rancid, it's quite mild for a blue cheese, really creamy actually.

I don't eat it all year round, just at Christmas (or Dec/Jan to be precise).
smiling badger

But just , loads of it.
Butts

I've usually had enough by about Jan 4th when there's only really scabby bits at the back of the fridge.
smiling badger

I think that the cheese that you have started eating tonight, already looks a bit scabby.
Get some Edam on your biscuits, man!
Butts

If you want to acquire the taste for blue cheese start with a nice mild Stilton or an Italian dolcelatte and then take things from there.. like a Gorgonzola or this Spanish Valdeon which, if you leave it a room temperature, tries to crawl off the plate.


bearing

I remember having a large block of Valdeon one Christmas, ate it over a few nights.  Well, you know how when you've eaten a lot of garlic and you sweat it out?  Well I was sweating out the pure essence of Valdeon for about a week!
Butts

Having said all that my favourite is still a mature Cheddar, there's so much more choice on line now it's mind boggling.

Like here

http://www.finecheese.co.uk/index.php/
bearing

Butts wrote:
Having said all that my favourite is still a mature Cheddar, there's so much more choice on line now it's mind boggling.


Have you tried this Cheddar Butts?



It is in my opinion quite delicious.
Butts

No I will, can you get it most places?
Forest

I just bought some of that tonight, it's a BOGOF at Tesco
bearing

Butts wrote:
No I will, can you get it most places?


Yeah, I think Tesco have it 2 for 1 at the moment, it's certainly my favourite cheese from a supermarket.
Fin

Had a lovely cheese board in a restaurant with a very nom nom piece with peppercorns  on it.

i have also twice yes twice had a go at eating the butter knob thinking it was another piece of cheese
Butts

For later



and Cornish Yarg which gets its green appearance from being wrapped in nettles.

Carp

I seem to remember a Yarg type thread in the past.
Butts

Yarg is a semi-hard cow's milk cheese made in Cornwall, United Kingdom from the milk of Friesian cows. Before being left to mature, this cheese is carefully wrapped in nettle leaves to form an edible, though mouldy, rind. The texture varies from creamy and soft immediately under the nettle coating to a Caerphilly cheese-like crumbly texture in the middle.[1] Modern production is at Pengreep farm near Truro, by Lynher Dairies from an old recipe. "Yarg" is simply "Gray" spelled backwards, after Allan and Jenny Gray, the couple who gave the recipe to Pengreep Farm in the 1970s.[2]
Carp

Thanks. I have tried it. There is def a thread on here about Yarg.

The fact about the naming is brill btw.
Butts

I'm eating it now and it's like two different cheeses, quite Cheddar-like at first then it goes all crumbly like a Lancs in the middle. Not sure what the nettles add but it's very moreish.
bearing

Carp wrote:
Thanks. I have tried it. There is def a thread on here about Yarg.

The fact about the naming is brill btw.


http://regdafishthinktank.com/sutra142206.php#142206
Butts

I had some Yarg dreams last night, involving nettles. Weird.
Grind

Bonk cheese flakes, anyone?

Anyone?
Butts

If I could only we eat one thing ever again, right here right now, it would Kidderton Ash goat's cheese. Probably the finest  cheese I've ever eaten. Make sure you take it our of the fridge about half an hour before consuming.


bearing

Do you have to cut it on a piece of slate?

Looks to have a different texture through the middle, is this the case?
Butts

It is very complex in texture. Not my slate, unfortunately - off their website. Made in Preston.

An outstanding goats cheese handmade at Butler’s Ravens Oak Dairy, Kidderton Ash is log shaped and features a delicate creamy flavour. Sprinkled with charcoal ash prior to maturing, a fabulous visual effect can be appreciated when the cheese is sliced.

The contrast of textures can be enjoyed from the soft white coat, the firmer charcoal ash layer and then the soft luscious goats cheese in the centre. The velvety texture of the cheese when young becomes creamier as it matures.
bearing

It does look rather delectable.

I too am a cheese lover, but don't get to indulge too often.  I do love visiting a fromargerie while I'm holidaying in France though and delight in becoming a real pain in the arse to the artisan behind the counter.  

I'm sure they appreciate the eccentricity of an enthusiastic Englishman once in a while...
Butts

I've just eaten it all and don't feel remotely sick, there wasn't enough.
bearing

Where did you buy it?

Sainsbury's do it you know, just been on their site.  It's in the taste the difference range.
Butts

Waitrose although I've seen it Sainsburys as well.
bearing

I shall have to make a purchase, the beauty of it is Mrs t'bearing dislikes goats cheese.
Butts

bearing wrote:
I shall have to make a purchase, the beauty of it is Mrs t'bearing dislikes goats cheese.


I wish Mrs Butts disliked goats cheese.
Carp

bearing wrote:
the beauty of it is Mrs t'bearing dislikes goats cheese.


Me too. Mrs C likes though.
Grind

Just bought six bottles of Port (six grapes - it's pretty good and not too pricey).

Nom, nom, nom.

Errrr.......

And nom, nom, nom, hic.
bearing

Grind wrote:
Just bought six bottles of Port (six grapes - it's pretty good and not too pricey).

Nom, nom, nom.

Errrr.......

And nom, nom, nom, hic.


Graham's?
Fin

bearing wrote:
Do you have to cut it on a piece of slate?

Looks to have a different texture through the middle, is this the case?

I think it's slate right through
Grind

bearing wrote:
Grind wrote:
Just bought six bottles of Port (six grapes - it's pretty good and not too pricey).

Nom, nom, nom.

Errrr.......

And nom, nom, nom, hic.


Graham's?


Yep.

There's decent LBV Warre's knocking around downstairs too.

I only ever seem to drink the stuff this time of year.
bearing

Fin wrote:
bearing wrote:
Do you have to cut it on a piece of slate?

Looks to have a different texture through the middle, is this the case?

I think it's slate right through


Ta, for clearing that up Fin.
Grind

There's none left?

What about the little baby cheeses?
Butts

This looks an interesting stuffing from Hugh FW's programme just now.

http://www.rivercottage.net/recipes/hughs-pear-and-celeriac-stuffing/
Late Doors

Butts wrote:
If you want to acquire the taste for blue cheese start with a nice mild Stilton or an Italian dolcelatte and then take things from there.. like a Gorgonzola or this Spanish Valdeon which, if you leave it a room temperature, tries to crawl off the plate.




 Holy Moses, thats put me right off brecky. If you're still peckish after eating that you can help yourself to the bits in the corners between our shower tiles
Butts

Nigel Slater's pate or pork and fruit terrine. Made this earlier and although it needs a night in the fridge I must say I'd be surprised if there's any left by this time tomorrow.

Substituted the prunes for apricots. The vine leaves certainly add something different to it.

SERVES 6-8

onion 1 medium
garlic 2 large cloves
butter a thick slice, about 30g
minced fatty pork, such as belly 400g
pig's liver 100g
thyme leaves from a bushy sprig, finely chopped
ground mace ˝ tsp
hazelnuts 75g
dried prunes, pluots or figs 100g
vine leaves 8 medium sized, pickled or fresh

Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Melt the butter in a shallow pan then cook the onion and garlic until soft and translucent. Transfer to a mixing bowl. Put the minced pork into the bowl. Finely chop the liver and add to the pork with the thyme and mace. Season generously with salt and ground black pepper – a good half teaspoon of each. Roughly chop the hazelnuts and the dried fruits. Stir in thoroughly.

Line a 1.5 litre terrine with fresh or dried vine leaves. If you are using fresh ones, pour boiling water from the kettle over them first to both cleanse them and to make them supple enough to bend round the inside of the tin. Remove their tough stalks. Fill with the mixture, pushing it down into the corners. Push it down and wrap the vine leaves over the top. Cover with a lid of greaseproof paper and foil then place in a deep roasting tin and pour enough water in to come half-way up the side of the terrine.

Put into an oven preheated to 180C/gas mark 4 and leave for 1˝ hours. Test with a skewer – it is cooked when the skewer comes out hot (rather than just warm). Remove carefully from the oven (the hot water is easy to tip over). Leave to cool overnight, then refrigerate before eating.
Carp

Butts wrote:
I'd be surprised if there's any left by this time tomorrow.



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