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The Irish connection

 
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Late Doors
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:17 am    Post subject: The Irish connection  Reply with quote

Like Leeds Huddersfield has a good Irish heritage culture and the council organised a bit of a walk around town last Sunday examining various significant landmarks. Very interesting. Taking the time of the first waves of immigration around 1800 to present day university led migration. There was the Textile industry, agriculture, canals railway and the various building booms along with Motorway that attracted vast numbers particularly from the Connemara area. Towns seem to attract migrants from a particular area of another country. I understand Leeds has a Mayo connection but Huddersfield is very much a Connemara /Galway connection. The walk ended with a film about the Connemara connection in the Irish center and although amateurishly made it was interesting. Particularly for us as MrsDs parents are from Lettermore that seems to be the epicenter of Connemara migration to Huddersfield and a good connection remains particularly with the Galic football.

People used to walk from Galway to Dublin, get the ferry to Liverpool and some even walked from Liverpool to Huddersfield. Most came by train though and the first stop was the Olde Hatte pub, for so long the Irish social center outside the clubs in town. It acted as a kind of Job agency and accommodation center. MrsD's Dad used to take on people and house them or find them other places. For years he was a main lad amongst the community and I knew who he was even before I met MrsD. Really really nice bloke even when he was the oldest bouncer in town at the Irish league .

MrsD told a few stories of her upbringing that made the guide laugh and I chipped in with a couple of tales about my second generation friends. I didn't know though that her mum used to tell her and her sisters to say they were from Galway not Connemara so people didn't think you were thick though . She can get away with that though

The tour guide said a couple of times that Huddersfield was known as a great place for Irish immigrants, always welcoming, no prejudice and easy integration. I've heard the same said from Caribbean immigrants as well. That makes me very proud about the ol' place. I've never had a bad experience with either community, only great ones.
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Cutsyke
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The maddest Irishmen I know are from Connemara. Interesting that Huddersfield, so close to Leeds but drawing on different counties.

There's Irish on both sides of my family though patents are both born in Leeds. Over here people with heritage like that would call themselves Irish, me, I'm a Yorkshireman.
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Late Doors
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

aye, Like MrsD's and her siblings although proud of teh Irish familly are all thoroughly English/Yorkshire as are most of my second gen mates. A few went the full on Harp thing Cletic/ireland kind of thing. Interesting that her mother didnt bother at all with "being Irish" but her Dad was full on till the day he past away. Yet to me, she was the most Irish, if that doesnt seem too..err Irish
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 09, 2017 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One thing i did forget to mention about the walk was a little bit on the temperance movement that the lad struggled to convince us that the Irish immigrants embraced by taken the pledge and not drink alcohol. Many eyebrows were raised amongst the group as we all contemplated the many Irishmen who have enhanced my and there lives. I haven't met a single one who has p!edged to do anything about the drink other than enjoy it.Maybe a tad too much in some cases but ......
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Late Doors wrote:
One thing i did forget to mention about the walk was a little bit on the temperance movement that the lad struggled to convince us that the Irish immigrants embraced by taken the pledge and not drink alcohol. Many eyebrows were raised amongst the group as we all contemplated the many Irishmen who have enhanced my and there lives. I haven't met a single one who has p!edged to do anything about the drink other than enjoy it.Maybe a tad too much in some cases but ......
Irish men signing the pledge is not that uncommon. The temperance movement was popular during the 19th century. Hard to believe, I know, but I think even some of my forebears did.

Britain's last remaining temperance bar, Fitzpatrick's in Rawtenstall, was part of a chain built up by a family from Ireland.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, did not know that. Any kind of pub still open these days is an achievement
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 12:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got a vague memory of a coffin shaped lapel pin with a silver cross on it been a sign someone had taken the pledge. I know loads of Irish folk who've sworn off drink.
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 4:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I knew some Irish blokes in Leeds who'd be in their late seventies and eighties (including the man who started up the GAA interest in Leeds who's no longer with us) who had taken the temperance pledge as young men. I think it pushed them further up the suitability ladder with girls families as to future son-in-law material. Another reason behind the pledge was lack of money. They had fuck all and contrary to the lazy stereotypes, didn't have the money for boozing in their own country so when they came over here and we're earning good money they might have made up for lost time re drinking a lot of pop. Ireland has in the main always been a poor country, which if you think about it is why so many wanted to move here for work, and work they did. My Dad's family were of Irish origin and I'm proud of my heritage.

You're right LD Leeds is more Mayo. I love Ireland and the Irish both Republic and the North but one thing I know for a fact is that the ex-pats (and their second and third generation offspring) are a cliquey lot and I know some lads from Northern Ireland who've gotten the cold shoulder when they have gone in The Leeds Irish Centre expecting the craic and a friendly pint. A real if-your-face-fits kind of venue. The older Irish who came over in the late forties and fifties often told me about how if you weren't from a certain county you wouldn't get work on particular building sites etc. Eg the Wexford lads would all clan together as would the Galway lot etc. Believe it or not the big pub run for the first big wave of Irish immigrants in the fifties used to be from Chapeltown down to Roundhay Rd ending up in The Pointer. Lots of the big terraces in Chapeltown were lodging houses for Irish lads and lasses off the boat and in search of work and digs.
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 1:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That county thing is big everywhere with them. When I get introduced as from Leeds I'm often asked if I have family in Mayo - by the older blokes I know not the younger ones. Different jobs over here were somewhat locked down by different counties. Years ago an Kerryman who was in admin on the buses was reputed to give answer sheets out to Kerrymen the night be fore the test for jobs - union.

Centre's a funny place. I've never had any issues but there were deff different cliques there. Used to drink in The White Stag, Pointers, Vic  New Roscoe etc... The lads I knocked about with called the other lot the Yahooies (spelling) most, though not all were sons of blokes who'd got on a bit and interestingly enough, they were the ones who'd 'develop' an Irish accent.

Since I've come to America every single job I've had has come via an Irish friend. They have been great to me. Joined two different unions, and got a trade - an apprenticeship in my 40s! When my wife was in hospital my gaffer's wife made me dinner every night, made sure I was fighting fit. When we landed here I didn't have time to get a social security number I was too busy working. First interview I had the guy who has since become a great friend asked what my wife was doing. When I explained she wasn't working yet but had waitressed he barely raised an eyebrow. When I got home there was a message on the answer machine, she had a job not an interview in Rosie O'Grady's - if you know NY you now it's a prime location and you'd make silly money in there. Didn't pan out, she'd already got herself a job that afternoon. When I needed a job in order to get a greencard an Irish bar owner wrote a letter saying I had a job at his bar. Only time I've ever had an issue was with some blokes from Tyrone at about 6am in a bar on the Westside, The Parlour, after a lock in prior to a Celtic Rangers game and upstairs in Dempsey's after a Celtic friendly with two lads from the north. Oh and some misguided Irish Americans after the bars closed.  That said, I've met some great guys from Derry and had a lot of fun. For a long time I rarely drank with the English lads who used the same bars as they were cheap as fuck and embarrassing tippers.

In 11 years of hard drinking in NY, The Bronx, Queens, everything from Club USA and The Limelight to McGoverns on Skillman Ave and The Villager on Brain Damage Ave, places that didn't get going 'til after 4am I've not been in a single fight. Aside from my kids been half Irish, I've a shit load of time for the Irish.
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Late Doors
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ace, there was an Irish thing running through Bonfire as well you probably recognised. Ive been to a few Irish "Dos" since i met MrsD over the years. Everyone of them has seen some kind of Falling out Nothing major but it always seems to be the women kicking off


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